A New Book Trailer And More

Well, it’s been quite a week. Tonight I’m doing an In Conversation event as part of the wonder Leeds LitFest, which is roaring along in its second yeay, ambitious and energised.

I’ve also been digging into the history of Sheepscar. In part, of course, because where Tom and Annabelle Harper live, but also because my family has some roots there, at the Victoria public house (my great-grandfather ran it from the 1920s to the 1940s) and beyond (more to come on that).

Surprisingly, no one has studied the history of the area, which means a lot of digging and piecing things together from censuses, old plans, maps, anything I can find. It’s strictly for my own pleasure, really, although, since i’m a writer, I’m putting it all together – 7000 words so far, along with photos and so much more, almost 50 pages’ worth.

But I haven’t forgotten that The Molten City arrives in three weeks. It’s available to bloggers and reviewers on NetGalley, so if you’re approved, get over there…if not, I’m afraid you’ll need to wait. But in the meantime, here’s a second trailer for the book.

4 thoughts on “A New Book Trailer And More

  1. Chris, my sister put me onto your books , of course since we lived down the street from the Vic, Roundhasy St.
    We lived in that back to back from 1944 to early 1960’s when we were moved into Meanwood for slum clearance.
    Sheepscar. means so much to me. I left Meanwood to immigrate to Canada two days after Christmas 1966. Went back a couple of times but by then the whole area was gone. My mum used to clead the Queens and I do believe she also did some at the Vic.

    Anyways, I wish you all the very best and look forward to reading it.
    Maureen Clarke

    1. Ah, you knew the area – from the 20s to the 40s, my great-grandfather ran the Victoria. I went in once during the 90s when I was home (I lived in the US for 30 years). I’m currently researching Sheepscar for a historical piece, so if you have any memories and observations to share, please email me through this site – I’d love to know. There’s a sidebar on Manor Street, the rise, they heyday and decline..

  2. It would be interesting to go back in a time machine and see what Sheepscar was like before all those roads… and industrial blocks!

  3. Until 1850 it was mostly bucolic, although the dye works had been there for about 100 years. About 1790, dye works, but hardly anything else…and no Roundhay Road.

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